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    By anncathrin

    Crispy crackling

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    Having the crispiest crackling is a matter of pride among Norwegians, and an area where cooks compete. This recipe is taking the competition to a new level. It’s a long-winded process. But the result is crackling which is so crispy and light that I have never experienced its like. Delicious with slow-roasted pork ribs or pork belly.

    10-15 pieces

    PREPARATION:

    • 1

      Boil the rind over a low heat for 6 hours. Do not allow it to boil fast, otherwise the rind might tear. Drain the water very carefully and lay the rind on a piece of greaseproof paper, preferably in layers consisting of rind and greaseproof paper. Place the rind in the fridge overnight to cool. Once it has cooled the remaining fat beneath the rind will have hardened so much that it will be fairly easy to scrape it off using a small knife.

    • 2

      Divide the rind into 4 x 6 cm portions. The rind will expand to double its size once it has been fried. Lay the pieces on a sheet of greaseproof paper or an old, non-fluffy kitchen towel in a baking pan.

    • 3

      Place the rind in the oven for 3 days at a temperature of 120 Fahrenheit (50 Celsius). The rind should dry out completely. Deep-fry the dried rind for a maximum of 7 seconds at a temperature of 370 Fahrenheit (190 Celsius). If you do not have a deep-fat fryer, you can just as easily use a saucepan, but please be careful. It is extremely inflammable. Add salt to taste.

    This entry was posted in Andreas Viestad, Episodes, Recipes by chef, S10 E06 The Grain Belt of the Country and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.
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  • Having the crispiest crackling is a matter of pride among Norwegians, and an area where cooks compete. This recipe is taking the competition to a new level. It’s a long-winded process. But the result is crackling which is so crispy and light that I have never experienced its like. Delicious with slow-roasted pork ribs or pork belly.

    10-15 pieces

    PREPARATION:

    • 1

      Boil the rind over a low heat for 6 hours. Do not allow it to boil fast, otherwise the rind might tear. Drain the water very carefully and lay the rind on a piece of greaseproof paper, preferably in layers consisting of rind and greaseproof paper. Place the rind in the fridge overnight to cool. Once it has cooled the remaining fat beneath the rind will have hardened so much that it will be fairly easy to scrape it off using a small knife.

    • 2

      Divide the rind into 4 x 6 cm portions. The rind will expand to double its size once it has been fried. Lay the pieces on a sheet of greaseproof paper or an old, non-fluffy kitchen towel in a baking pan.

    • 3

      Place the rind in the oven for 3 days at a temperature of 120 Fahrenheit (50 Celsius). The rind should dry out completely. Deep-fry the dried rind for a maximum of 7 seconds at a temperature of 370 Fahrenheit (190 Celsius). If you do not have a deep-fat fryer, you can just as easily use a saucepan, but please be careful. It is extremely inflammable. Add salt to taste.

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